Mounting USB Partition in openSUSE LinuxMounting USB Partition in openSUSE Linux

26 04 2007

In most cases, when you put a USB stick into your USB port on a machine running openSUSE, a window will appear asking what you’d like to do. This is done by the Hardware Abstraction Layer service running in the background.

However, what about cases where you need to manually mount a USB stick? For example, if you have a custom-compiled kernel module that you need to load off a USB stick during installation, what do you do? HAL ain’t gonna save your bacon. You’ll want to know how to get the USB stuff up and cracking very quickly with minimal fooling around.

This is a quick re-write of my last tip, except that it is easier for users with regular accounts to work with the USB stick.

In your /proc directory, there is a file called partitions. To see which partitions are available to the system at any given time, you can do cat /proc/partition at a terminal. With no USB sticks plugged in, mine looks like this:


[2001][scott@desk:~]$ cat /proc/partitions
major minor  #blocks  name

   3     0  195360984 hda
   3     1      40131 hda1
   3     2    1959930 hda2
   3     3   29302560 hda3
   3     4  164055780 hda4
[2001][scott@desk:~]$

Now, when I plug in a USB stick (or card reader with a card inserted), this is what I get:


[2001][scott@desk:~]$ cat /proc/partitions
major minor  #blocks  name

   3     0  195360984 hda
   3     1      40131 hda1
   3     2    1959930 hda2
   3     3   29302560 hda3
   3     4  164055780 hda4
   8     0     124048 sda
   8     1     123888 sda1
[2020][scott@desk:~]$

You can see that sda and sda1 were added. sda refers to the drive. It’s the sda1 that we care about. Just add /dev/ to the front of that to get the partition we want to mount. Our partition is /dev/sda1.

Next, we just pick a place to mount it to. As su I just create a directory called /media/usbstick or something similar. Then, you run your mount command as su with this syntax:

mount -t [filesystem type] [usb stick partition] [target mount point] -o rw,nosuid,nodev,noatime,uid=1000,utf8,shortname=lower

If I were mounting the USB stick as /dev/sda1 onto the mount point /media/usbstick, this command would look like this:

mount -t vfat /dev/sda1 /media/usbstick -o rw,nosuid,nodev,noatime,uid=1000,utf8,shortname=lower

In most cases, vfat for the filesystem type for a USB stick should work just fine (unless you know it to be something else).

After you run this command, you should be in business. You can open a terminal as your regular user and change and modify the USB partition with minimal trouble.

If you wish to have this USB partition mounted automatically, you can edit your /etc/fstab file to do this.

As su, open your /etc/fstab file in your favorite text editor. Add a line, with this syntax:


[usb stick partition]            [target mount point]      auto       auto,user

If using /dev/sda1 as my usb stick partition and /media/usbstick as my target mount point, I would put this into my fstab:


/dev/sda1            /media/usbstick      auto       auto,user

The only thing you really need to know about this is that it makes it so that regular users can mount the USB stick. Of course, the user who mounts it is considered as the owner of the partition and its files (at least in the case of the USB stick).

Save your file and exit. Then, to mount it, just run the following command (as a normal user, even):

mount /media/usbstick

You will then notice that your user has full access to the USB stick.

To Review:

  1. cat /proc/partitions – find the partition of your USB stick
  2. make a mount point (perhaps in /media) to which you will mount the USB stick
  3. for user accessibility, edit your /etc/fstab file
  4. mount the usb stick

Most of the time, when you plug in a USB stick or card reader (with a card in it), SUSE will just pop open a window asking you if you want to see the contents of the device. However, in cases where that does not happen, or you are using a distribution that doesn’t do that, this is one way to mount a USB partition.

Source: http://www.suseblog.com by Scott Morris

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openSUSE 10.2: Installing and Running VMware Workstation 6.0

24 04 2007

VMWare Workstation is powerful desktop virtualization software for software developers/testers and enterprise IT professionals that runs multiple operating systems simultaneously on a single PC. Users can run Windows, Linux, NetWare, or Solaris x86 in fully networked, portable virtual machines—no rebooting or hard drive partitioning required.As I had VMware Workstation running on all my previous SUSE distros, I decided to install the latest available version 6.0 build 44426 on my openSUSE 10.2 desktop. Even though as of now it is only beta version, the final version will have the same procedure for installation, which is not difficult. I usually use VMware Workstation to run other versions of Linux distributions, as well as Windows XP for checking out few applications that I would like to try without restarting my PC.

The latest release of VMware Workstation 6.0 ( beta version as of writing this) has now support for multiple monitors, Vista, USB 2.0 devices and ACE Authoring Capabilities – securely package and deploy desktop virtual machines with encryption, network access and device control, and much more.The latest VMware Workstation comes with quite a few new features – Release Notes contain a summary of features and known issues.

IMPORTANT: Current and previous versions of VMware can’t coexist on the same box. The kernel drivers that are the virtualisation can’t exist twice.

I. Prerequisites

1. kernel-source | 2. gcc | 3. gcc-c++ | 4. make

(The kernel-source packages must match the installed kernel!)

Grab a copy of latest available VMware Workstation 6.0 build (RPM file). Download the version that suits your distribution, i.e. 32-bit or 64-bit.

II. Installation and Configuring

1. Change to root and then install the rpm where you downloaded the file :

# rpm -ivh VMware-workstation-6.0.0-xxxx.yyy.rpm

(where xxxx is the build version and yyy is the architecture)

2. Once installed we need to configure VMware and create kernel modules that will be loaded when booting your openSUSE 10.2. For this execute the following command as root:

# vmware-config.pl

While configuring I accepted all of the defaults to the questions that are asked, meaning the paths to directories that were listed, “yes” wherever there was [yes] as default option, and “no” where it was [no]. There will be instances where you will be directed to read certain license agreements as well as network configuration install – you will need to use “Shift” -then- “q” to exit the editor mode.

Once the modules have been compiled, the next phase is to configure networking. As I have ethernet connection for internet I selected eth0 as I want my guest OS to have access to internet.

There are some new features that 6.0 presents and some more configuration questions. I opted not to install Eclipse Integrated Virtual Debugger, as I don’t think I will ever need it, but agreed to install VMware VIX API Installer, as you can see from the following screenshot:

Once it’s all configured, the final stage follows, which creates the list of modules that are supposed to be loaded when your openSUSE 10.2 boots, as well as loads them right away to start using your VMware Workstation.

Once completed, you will find VMware Workstation has been addded to your KDE menu under System -> More Programs (not sure about where it goes under Gnome menu). You can also run it by issuing a command as user – vmware

III. USB Access to Guest OS

Execute the following as root to have access to USB:

# mount -t usbfs /dev/bus/usb /proc/bus/usb

or try running the following command as root to mount the file system to the expected location:

# mount -t usbfs none /proc/bus/usb

Here is a video (the quality is not that good but gives a picture) of me running Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn 64-bit version. All works nicely, including audio and internet connection. The question is though how I verify that VMware-Tools has been successfully being used which gives me graphical boost under guest OS (of course I have installed it).

As well check out the User Manual which provides more detailed set-up and how-to information.

That’s all ….. enjoy virtualisation via VMware Workstation.

Also check out:

Free Virtualization Products from VMware:

  • VMware Player – Run, share and evaluate pre-built applications and beta software in virtual machines with VMware Player.
  • VMware Converter – Convert your physical machines to virtual machines in minutes with VMware Converter, a reliable tool that automates the process of creating VMware virtual machines without disruption or downtime.
  • VMware Server – Start experiencing the benefits of virtualization with VMware Server, a robust yet easy to use product for users new to server virtualization technology. Add centralized management to your VMware Server environment with VMware VirtualCenter for VMware Server.
  • Virtual Appliances Marketplace – Download pre-installed and pre-configured applications that run in a virtual machine. Access the directory of free Virtual Appliances.

Source: http://linux.wordpress.com/ by E@zyVG





ZLM client removed from openSUSE

21 04 2007

On SUSE Linux 10.1 it was required, on openSUSE 10.2 you can deselect it during installation, for openSUSE 10.3 it was planned to be made an optional install but yesterday Andreas Jaeger announced:

openSUSE is focusing on native software management by using YaST
and libzypp, the package management library.

ZENworks Linux Management is Novell's solution for enterprise-class
resource management for desktops and servers. ZENworks components are
fully available and supported for SUSE Linux Enterprise based products
and not longer part of the openSUSE distribution.

Product development for both ZENworks and SUSE Linux Enterprise
concentrates on continued interoperability solutions for remote and
local software management.

Meaning no Zenworks for future openSUSE releases and use of native tools only – zypper, opensuse-updater and YaST. This is definitely good idea – make the existing package manager better and more reliable, instead of adding and integrating another one. The next openSUSE 10.3 Alpha featuring no ZMD at all is planned for May 16.





ZLM client removed from openSUSE

21 04 2007

On SUSE Linux 10.1 it was required, on openSUSE 10.2 you can deselect it during installation, for openSUSE 10.3 it was planned to be made an optional install but yesterday Andreas Jaeger announced:

openSUSE is focusing on native software management by using YaST
and libzypp, the package management library.

ZENworks Linux Management is Novell's solution for enterprise-class
resource management for desktops and servers. ZENworks components are
fully available and supported for SUSE Linux Enterprise based products
and not longer part of the openSUSE distribution.

Product development for both ZENworks and SUSE Linux Enterprise
concentrates on continued interoperability solutions for remote and
local software management.

Meaning no Zenworks for future openSUSE releases and use of native tools only – zypper, opensuse-updater and YaST. This is definitely good idea – make the existing package manager better and more reliable, instead of adding and integrating another one. The next openSUSE 10.3 Alpha featuring no ZMD at all is planned for May 16.





SLED 10 SP1 Review!

11 04 2007

Hello, All

Sorry about the late posting of SP1 for SLED. After along Two weeks waiting I finally downloaded the ISO from Novell’s Beta Website for SLED SP1, and let me tell you it was not easy after two tries I got the download started using the third mirror on there site. Once I got home from the store I realized that I brought DVD+R instead of DVD-R which is what myDVD Burner accepts .

Read the rest of this entry »





Pidgin 2.0.0 (GAIM)

9 04 2007

Sunday, April 08, 2007

New name for GAIM (Pidgin)


GTK+ AOL Instant Messenger will have a new name:

Soon version 2.0.0 will be release with the name “Pidgin 2.0.0

This follows a lengthy and, unfortunately, secret legal process with AOL, which also prevented any code releases except betas. The project will now be known as Pidgin IM.

Left: Sean Egan (2006)

Source: http://linux.wordpress.com/ by E@zyVG